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Bill Tracker

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based on: CSCA public bill report

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Notes about this profile:

Bill No. Title Sponsors (House and Senate)SummaryStatusPosition
HB22-1002 Fifth Year High School Concurrent Enrollment House:
M. Weissman (D)
J. Bacon (D)
Senate:
J. Buckner (D)

Under current law, a qualified student who is selected to
participate in the accelerating students through concurrent enrollment
(ASCENT) program by the department of education (department) may
enroll in postsecondary courses and be included in the pupil enrollment
of a school district, board of cooperative services, or charter school (local

education provider) for funding during the year following the student's
fourth year of high school. The number of students who are selected to
participate in the ASCENT program is limited each year through the
budget process.
The bill removes the limit on the number of program participants
and allows each qualified student selected by the enrolling local education
provider to participate in the program. The bill reduces the number of
postsecondary credits a qualified student must have completed to be
eligible to participate in the ASCENT program. The bill directs the
department to distribute to each local education provider for each
ASCENT program participant an amount equal to 3% of the per-pupil
extended high school funding amount to pay for non-tuition expenses the
qualified student incurs in participating in the postsecondary courses.
Under existing law, a qualified student who fails to complete a
concurrent enrollment course must repay the local education provider for
the amount of tuition, and a local education provider may require a
qualified student to repay the tuition amount if the qualified student earns
a failing grade for a concurrent enrollment course. The bill repeals these
provisions.

House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed: 05/12/2022c
HB22-1052 Promoting Crisis Services To Students House:
H. McKean (R)
B. McLachlan (D)
Senate:
K. Priola (D)
D. Moreno (D)

Colorado Youth Advisory Council Review Committee. The bill
requires each student identification card issued to a public school student
to contain the phone number, website address, and text talk number for
the 24-hour telephone crisis service center (Colorado crisis services). If
the school does not issue identification cards, the school shall request and
display outreach materials from Colorado crisis services.

The bill requires that Colorado crisis services notify each public
school in the state that it can provide outreach materials explaining the
services provided, how to engage the services, and the possibility of
peer-to-peer counseling as part of the offered services. Colorado crisis
services shall provide those materials upon request.

Governor Signed: 06/08/2022c
HB22-1057 Public Employees' Retirement Association Employment After Teacher Retirement House:
B. McLachlan (D)
M. Bradfield (R)
Senate:
R. Zenzinger (D)

Under current law, the public employees' retirement association
(PERA) limits the number of days that retired teachers can work as
substitute teachers. The bill temporarily waives these limits for qualified
service retirees in any school district while there are critical substitute
teacher shortages.

Governor Signed: 03/17/2022c
HB22-1066 Public Education Curriculum And Professional Development Information House:

Senate:

Beginning with the 2022-23 school year, the bill requires each
school district, each board of cooperative services that operates a public
school, and each charter school (local education provider) to post on its

website:
  • A list of the educational materials that the local education
provider uses for each grade, subject, and course;
  • A copy of each survey, nonacademic assessment, analysis,
and evaluation distributed to students;
  • A list of the devices, programs, and software that the local
education provider uses that collect student biometric data;
and
  • Information concerning the professional development
requirements for educators whom the local education
provider employs.
A local education provider may adopt a policy concerning the
teaching of controversial issues. At a minimum, the policy must include
procedures for reporting policy violations, and the local education
provider must post the policy on its website.
Upon request, a local education provider must provide a copy of
an item on the educational materials list to the parents of enrolled
students. The local education provider shall not impose a nondisclosure
requirement on a parent.

House Committee on Education Postpone Indefinitely: 03/03/2022c
HB22-1090 Reasonable Independence For Children House:
M. Young (D)
Senate:
J. Buckner (D)
J. Smallwood (R)

Under current law, a child is neglected or dependent if the child's
environment is injurious to the child's health or welfare. The bill clarifies
that a child is not neglected when allowed to participate in certain
independent activities that a reasonable and prudent parent, guardian, or
legal custodian would consider safe given the child's maturity, condition,

and abilities.

Governor Signed: 03/30/2022c
HB22-1106 Concealed Handguns On School Grounds House:

Senate:

With certain exceptions, current law prohibits a concealed carry
permit holder from carrying a concealed handgun on public elementary,
middle, junior high, or high school grounds. The bill removes this
limitation. The bill prohibits a local government from prohibiting carrying
a concealed handgun on school grounds by a person who has a valid
concealed carry permit.

House Committee on State, Civic, Military, & Veterans Affairs Postpone Indefinitely: 02/28/2022c
HB22-1146 Investment of Public School Fund Study And Report House:
J. McCluskie (D)
Senate:
P. Lundeen (R)
B. Kirkmeyer (R)

Legislative Interim Committee on School Finance. The bill
staggers the terms of the state treasurer's 3 appointed members to the
investment board, commencing with new appointments beginning on and
after July 1, 2022, to ensure that no more than 2 members' terms expire
in the same year.
The bill creates a working group, convened by the state treasurer,
Capital letters or bold & italic numbers indicate new material to be added to existing law.
to consider opportunities to improve earnings on the deposit and
investment of money in the fund, while safeguarding the endowment for
public schools and complying with state and federal laws relating to state
school trust lands and the fund. The bill authorizes the state treasurer,
after consulting with the investment board, to select the members of the
working group, and the bill specifies the issues the working group must
study. The state treasurer shall report the findings and recommendations
of the working group to the joint budget committee and to the education
committees of the house of representatives and of the senate during the
2023 legislative session.
The bill clarifies the time frame and circumstances in which a
realized investment loss to the fund may be offset by realized gains before
the general assembly is required to appropriate money to cover losses to
the fund.

Governor Signed: 05/26/2022c
HB22-1155 In-state Tuition For Colorado High School Graduates House:
J. McCluskie (D)
Senate:
D. Moreno (D)
J. Gonzales (D)

Under existing law, an institution of higher education (institution)
must classify a student, other than a nonimmigrant alien, as an in-state
student for tuition purposes if the student attended high school in
Colorado for at least 3 years immediately preceding the date the student
either graduated from a Colorado high school or successfully completed

a high school equivalency examination and the student is admitted to
college within 12 months of graduating high school or completing the
equivalency examination. The bill repeals the requirements that a student
has attended a Colorado high school for 3 years and be admitted to
college within 12 months of graduating or completing an equivalency
examination.
The bill requires an institution to classify a student as an in-state
student for tuition purposes if the student:
  • Graduated from a Colorado high school or successfully
completed a high school equivalency examination in
Colorado; and
  • Has resided in Colorado for at least 12 consecutive months
prior to enrolling in an institution.
Because the bill repeals the requirement to be admitted to college
within 12 months of graduation, the bill also repeals the exception to that
requirement for a student who does not have lawful immigration status
and graduated or successfully completed the equivalency examination
prior to September 1, 2013.

Governor Signed: 05/26/2022c
HB22-1220 Removing Barriers To Educator Preparation House:
B. McLachlan (D)
C. Kipp (D)
Senate:
R. Zenzinger (D)

The bill creates the student educator stipend program. The purpose
of the student educator stipend program is to award stipend money to an
eligible student to reduce the financial barriers of participating in required
clinical practice as a student educator. An eligible student placed as a
student educator in a 16-week academic residency may receive a stipend

of $11,000, and an eligible student placed as a student educator in a
32-week academic residency may receive a stipend of $22,000.
The bill also creates the educator test stipend program. The
purpose of the educator test stipend program is to award stipend money
to approved programs of preparation to reduce financial barriers for
eligible students preparing for the assessment of professional
competencies for licensure and each required endorsement area. The
approved program of preparation shall distribute the stipend money to an
eligible student to pay the fees and costs associated with the assessment
of professional competencies, which may include travel and lodging
costs.
The bill requires the department of education (department), in
collaboration with the department of higher education and institutions of
higher education, to create a multiple measures approach to measure the
professional competencies of an applicant for an initial teacher license,
in addition to the assessments currently approved by the state board of
education.
Current law allows the department to issue a temporary educator
eligibility authorization to a person enrolled in an approved program of
preparation for a special education educator license who has not yet met
the requirements for the applicable initial educator license. The bill
allows the department to issue a temporary educator eligibility
authorization to a person enrolled in an approved alternative teacher
preparation program who has not yet met the requirements for the
applicable initial educator license.

Governor Signed: 05/26/2022c
HB22-1240 Mandatory Reporters House:
M. Froelich (D)
M. Young (D)
Senate:
R. Fields (D)
C. Simpson (R)

The bill creates the mandatory reporter task force (task force). The
purpose of the task force is to analyze best practices and recommend
changes to training materials and reporting procedures for people required
by law to report child abuse or neglect. The task force shall analyze the
effectiveness of mandatory reporting and its relationship with systemic
issues, including the disproportionate impact of mandatory reporting on

families of color and under-resourced communities. The task force may
propose clarifications to the law to help implement its recommendations.
The task force operates for 2 years. The task force shall submit a final
report on its findings and recommendations on January 1, 2025, to the
house of representatives public and behavioral health and human services
committee and the senate health and human services committee, or their
successor committees, the governor, and the department of human
services.
The bill also updates mandatory reporting requirements and
procedures for people required to report child abuse or neglect
(mandatory reporters). The updates include:
  • Changing the time frame for reporting child abuse or
neglect from immediately to within 24 hours;
  • Requiring reporting on unlawful sexual behavior;
  • Requiring employers to notify and to provide materials to
their employees regarding mandatory reporter
responsibilities; and
  • Changing the mental state of a person who violates the
mandatory reporter provision from willfully to
knowingly.

Governor Signed: 06/02/2022c
HB22-1243 School Security and School Behavioral Health Services Funding House:

Senate:
C. Kolker (D)
N. Hinrichsen (D)

The bill creates the school security disbursement program cash
fund (cash fund). The department of public safety (department) may
disburse money from the cash fund to school districts, charter schools,
and boards of cooperative services to improve security within public
schools. The bill appropriates $6,000,000 to the cash fund.

The temporary youth mental health services program is set to
repeal on June 30, 2022. The bill continues the temporary youth mental
health services program and the bi-annual reporting requirements until
June 30, 2024.
The bill appropriates $2 million from the behavioral and mental
health cash fund to the department of education for the behavioral health
care professional matching grant program.

Governor Signed: 05/19/2022c
HB22-1255 Improve Higher Education For Students With A Disability House:
M. Bradfield (R)
D. Ortiz (D)
Senate:
R. Zenzinger (D)
B. Kirkmeyer (R)

The bill requires the department of higher education (department)
to submit, as a part of its annual State Measurement for Accountable,
Responsive, and Transparent (SMART) Government Act hearing, data
related to postsecondary outcomes for students with a disability. The
department shall gather the data in collaboration with institutions of
higher education (institutions).

The bill creates the postsecondary services advisory committee
(committee) in the department for the purpose of making
recommendations to institutions and the general assembly concerning
necessary services and best practices to improve successful outcomes for
students with disabilities at institutions. The committee is required to
complete and submit a report to the education committees of the house of
representatives and the senate by June 15, 2023, and June 14, 2024. The
committee is repealed on June 30, 2024.

Governor Signed: 04/21/2022c
HB22-1278 Behavioral Health Administration House:
M. Young (D)
Senate:
C. Simpson (R)

The bill creates the behavioral health administration (BHA) in the
department of human services (department) to create a coordinated,
cohesive, and effective behavioral health system in the state. The BHA
will handle most of the behavioral health programs that were previously
handled by the office of behavioral health in the department. The bill
establishes a commissioner as the head of the BHA and authorizes the

commissioner and state board of human services to adopt and amend rules
that previously were promulgated by the executive director of the
department.
By July 1, 2024, the bill requires the BHA to establish:
  • A statewide behavioral health grievance system;
  • A behavioral health performance monitoring system;
  • A comprehensive behavioral health safety net system;
  • Regionally-based behavioral health administrative service
organizations;
  • The BHA as the licensing authority for all behavioral
health entities; and
  • The BHA advisory council to provide feedback to the BHA
on the behavioral health system in the state.
The bill transfers to the department of public health and
environment responsibility for community prevention and early
intervention programs previously administered by the department.
The bill makes extensive conforming amendments.

Governor Signed: 05/25/2022c
HB22-1283 Youth And Family Behavioral Health Care House:
D. Michaelson Jenet (D)
M. Bradfield (R)
Senate:
K. Priola (D)
J. Buckner (D)

The bill implements the recommendations of the behavioral health
transformational task force concerning youth and family residential care.
Specifically, the bill:
  • Creates in-home and residential respite care in 10-12
regions of the state for children and families;
  • Provides operational support for psychiatric residential

treatment facilities and qualified residential treatment
programs for youth; and
  • Provides funds to build and staff a neuro-psych facility at
the Colorado mental health institute at Fort Logan.
The bill requires the general assembly to appropriate money from
the behavioral and mental health cash fund to the department of human
services to implement the provisions of the bill.

Governor Signed: 05/18/2022c
HB22-1329 2022-23 Long Bill House:
J. McCluskie (D)
Senate:
C. Hansen (D)
Governor Signed: 04/25/2022c
HB22-1366 Improving Students' Postsecondary Options House:
C. Kipp (D)
Senate:
J. Bridges (D)

The bill establishes a number of new programs concerning
postsecondary career and education options for students, including:
  • Establishing the postsecondary, workforce, career, and
education grant program in the department of education
(CDE) to provide grants to local education providers to
improve the training of school educators and

administrators, to support students and families in
developing career and education plans for after high
school, and to increase the number of students for whom
applications for free financial aid are completed;
  • Creating regional postsecondary and workforce
coordinators in the CDE to train educators concerning
financial aspects of postsecondary options;
  • Updating the financial literacy resource bank to include
more information and training concerning postsecondary
financial aid;
  • Creating stipends for teachers who successfully complete
financial aid training;
  • Adding a requirement to individual career and
postsecondary education plans to include information about
available state and federal financial aid;
  • Requiring the department of higher education (CDHE) to
use technology to assist students and families in completing
postsecondary state and federal financial aid applications;
and
  • Requiring the CDHE to make certain improvements to
streamline the Colorado application for financial aid.
The bill appropriates money for each of the programs and specifies
that the CDE and the CDHE may use the money appropriated in
subsequent years without additional appropriation.

Governor Signed: 05/26/2022b
HB22-1376 Supportive Learning Environments For K-12 Students House:
L. Herod (D)
M. Young (D)
Senate:
K. Priola (D)
F. Winter (D)

The bill requires the department of education (department) to
compile data and create reports based on information received from
school districts and charter schools (schools) related to chronic
absenteeism rates, the number of in-school and out-of-school suspensions,
the number of expulsions, the number of students handcuffed or
restrained, the number of referrals to law enforcement, and the number of

school-related arrests. The department shall annually update and post
such data and reports on its website.
The department shall create easily accessible and user-friendly
school district profiles relating to school climate, including school climate
surveys.
Restrictions concerning the use of restraints on students are
increased, including providing, creating, and implementing training for
school staff and school security staff on the use of restraints and adding
restrictions to the use of restraints on students.
The department is required to develop a policy for hiring, training,
and evaluating school resource officers.
For the state fiscal year 2022-23, the bill requires an additional
appropriation of $2 million to the department to continue the expelled and
at-risk student services program for the purpose of providing services and
supports to develop effective attendance and discipline systems, to
address educational inequities and disproportionate discipline practices,
and to offer staff training and technical assistance to ensure the culturally
responsive implementation of services and supports.

Governor Signed: 05/26/2022c
HB22-1390 Public School Finance House:
B. McLachlan (D)
J. McCluskie (D)
Senate:
R. Zenzinger (D)
P. Lundeen (R)

Section 1 of the bill finds that current economic conditions have
increased the amount of revenue available to the state for the 2022-23
budget year, allowing the state to increase the amount of appropriation for
the state's share of total program funding for school districts and institute
charter schools, thereby mitigating the impact of the budget stabilization
factor. Additionally, it finds there is uncertainty concerning the continuity

and longevity of these current economic conditions and the reliability of
continuing high property values and increased revenue.
Section 2 of the bill:
  • Increases the statewide base per pupil funding for the
2022-23 budget year by $252.88, to account for inflation of
3.5%, to a new statewide base per pupil funding amount of
$7,478.16; and
  • Sets the total program funding for the 2022-23 budget year
for all school districts and institute charter schools after
application of the budget stabilization factor to not less
than $8,420,114,162.
Section 3 of the bill permits a public school one additional year to
discontinue the prohibited use of an American Indian mascot if the public
school was first notified of the prohibited use on or after January 1, 2022.
Section 4 of the bill extends by one year the requirement for a
board of cooperative services (BOCES) to obtain written permission from
the school district in which a school operates or is located if the BOCES
intends to authorize the school and the school is physically located within
the geographic boundaries of a school district that is not a member of the
BOCES.
Section 5 of the bill extends by one year the ability for local
education providers to carry forward more than 15% of per-pupil
intervention money received pursuant to the Colorado READ Act.
Sections 6 and 7 of the bill extend by one year the local
accountability system grant program and the requirement that the
department of education (department) contract with an external evaluator
to evaluate the implementation of the local accountability systems. The
bill makes an appropriation for this evaluation.
Section 8 of the bill extends by one year the completion of the
pilot program to develop and use screening and identification processes
and intervention strategies for early identification of and support for
students enrolled in kindergarten through third grade who may have
dyslexia.
Section 9 of the bill states that, if a school district permits a
student whose parent or guardian is a resident of the state but not a
resident of the district to attend school in the district, the school district
shall not require the parent, guardian, or student to pay tuition to attend
school in the district, regardless of when during the school year, or under
what circumstances, the student enrolls in or attends school in the district.
Section 10 of the bill authorizes financial assistance through the
educator recruitment and retention program to be used for applicants
agreeing to teach for 3 years in educator shortage areas in the state.
Section 11 of the bill permits a vendor that contracts with the
department to develop a quality teacher recruitment program, and
commits to satisfying the requirement to match 100% of the money paid
by the department for the contract through gifts, grants, or donations from
private donors, to also accept gifts, grants and donations from school
districts.
Section 12 of the bill removes the department's authority to
annually reallocate money among participating schools under the local
school food purchasing program.
Sections 13 to 16 of the bill extend by one year the K-5 social and
emotional health pilot program and amend the requirements for school
mental health professionals participating in the pilot program.
Section 17 of the bill permits 20% of the money appropriated for
the Colorado imagination library program to be used by the contractor for
operating costs.
Section 18 of the bill requires the state auditor to grant an
extension of the time to meet auditing requirements for the 2021-22
budget year for rural and small rural school districts that can demonstrate
difficulty in retaining an auditor, in lieu of prohibiting the release of tax
revenue for the school districts.

Governor Signed: 05/26/2022c
HB22-1411 Money From Coronavirus State Fiscal Recovery Fund House:
L. Herod (D)
J. McCluskie (D)
Senate:
D. Moreno (D)

In 2021, the state received $3,828,761,790 from the federal
coronavirus state fiscal recovery fund as part of the federal American
Rescue Plan Act of 2021. For purposes of complying with the

requirements established by the United States department of the treasury
(treasury), the general assembly established administrative requirements
related to the expenditure of this federal money. Section 1 of the bill
modifies these requirements by:
  • Establishing deadlines for a subrecipient, which is a person
that carries out a program or project on behalf of the state,
to expend or obligate this money, and if not, to return this
money to the state for the state to either expend or return to
treasury, depending on the timing;
  • Requiring the state controller to transmit to treasury any
money that was obligated by December 31, 2024, but not
expended by December 31, 2026;
  • Requiring the department of revenue to provide the state
controller with any information about any increases in the
state's net tax revenue, which is necessary for calculating
the state's revenue reductions for 2022 and 2023;
  • Clarifying that the compliance, reporting, record-keeping,
and program evaluation requirements established by the
office of state planning and budgeting and the state
controller apply to a person regardless of whether the
person is a beneficiary or a subrecipient and regardless of
whether the person receives the money directly from a
department or from a subrecipient; and
  • Permitting the state controller to report any expenditures to
treasury as a government service to the extent of the
reduction in the state's revenue due to the COVID-19
public health emergency relative to the revenues the state
collected for the state fiscal year 2018-19. Sections 3
through 6
make conforming amendments related to this
change.
The bill also substitutes money from the general fund or from a
cash fund that included money that originated from the general fund for
money that was allocated in 2021 legislation from the federal coronavirus
state fiscal recovery fund, as follows:
  • $29.5 million from the housing development grant fund
(section 7);
  • $36.5 million from the highway users tax fund that was
distributed to counties, cities, and incorporated towns,
which is accomplished by replenishing and reclassifying
the federal funds that were initially used (section 8);
  • $10 million from the Colorado startup loan program fund
(section 9), with the freed up federal funds being
transferred to the revenue loss restoration cash fund
(section 6); and
  • $98.5 million from the affordable housing and home
ownership cash fund (section 10).
Sections 2 and 6 include conforming amendments related to the
reclassification of the money paid to the counties, cities, and incorporated
towns.

Governor Signed: 05/27/2022c
SB22-039 Funding For Educational Opportunities Senate:
P. Lundeen (R)
B. Kirkmeyer (R)
House:

The bill requires the state treasurer to transfer $723 million from
the general fund to the state education fund for the 2022-23 budget year.
The bill repeals the budget stabilization factor starting in the
2023-24 budget year, and for each budget year thereafter.
The bill creates the Hope Scholarship Program (program) in the

department of education (department). The purpose of the program is to
meet the educational needs of every eligible student by assisting with
certain education expenses. The bill requires:
  • The department to contract with an entity that will
administer the program (administering entity);
  • The department to transfer to the administering entity an
amount equal to 125% of the prior budget year's average
state share of per pupil revenues for an eligible student who
receives a scholarship;
  • The department to prorate the amount transferred to the
administering entity based on the amount of time remaining
in the budget year, and deduct the amount transferred from
the amount that the department distributes to the eligible
student's school district of residence for the budget year in
which an account is created, subject to limitations;
  • The parent of an eligible student to apply to the
administering entity for a scholarship;

  • A parent of an eligible student to only spend scholarship
money on defined eligible expenses; and
  • The administering entity to oversee the program and
perform an audit to ensure scholarship money is spent on
defined eligible expenses.

Senate Committee on Education Postpone Indefinitely: 02/24/2022c
SB22-044 Use Of Student Growth In Educator Evaluations Senate:

House:
M. Froelich (D)
C. Kipp (D)

The bill clarifies the purposes of licensed educator performance
evaluations.
The bill directs the state board of education (state board) to adopt
rules as necessary to ensure that:
  • Beginning in the 2022-23 school year, student academic
growth is considered, without a percentage, along with the

quality standards as part of a comprehensive evaluation of
a teacher's or principal's performance; and
  • Student assessment scores may be used collectively at a
particular grade level or the school-building level solely for
specified purposes, and collective measures may not be
used beyond the school level.
The bill specifies the measures a school district or board of
cooperative services may consider in determining student academic
growth for purposes of evaluating teacher performance.

Senate Committee on Education Postpone Indefinitely: 03/10/2022c
SB22-069 Learning Disruption Effect On Teacher Evaluation Senate:

House:
M. Froelich (D)
B. McLachlan (D)

When disruptions in the delivery of instruction due to a disaster
emergency occur during a school year, the bill prohibits a school district
or board of cooperative services from considering student growth

measures or other student performance measures in evaluating the
performance of licensed educators until the disruptions have ceased for
2 consecutive school years and a baseline for student growth and
performance can be reestablished. The bill makes an exception to allow
the school district or board of cooperative services to use the measures in
a school year in which there are disruptions in the delivery of instruction
due to a disaster emergency, after consulting with the school district's or
board's advisory personnel performance evaluation council.

Governor Signed: 05/31/2022c
SB22-070 Kindergarten Through Twelfth Grade Licensed Personnel Performance Evaluations Senate:
J. Bridges (D)
House:
B. McLachlan (D)
J. McCluskie (D)

The bill specifies the duties of the department of education
(department) related to licensed personnel performance evaluation
systems, including the following duties, which the department must
comply with by the beginning of the 2023-24 school year:
  • Creating a modified rubric for evaluating personnel who
are consistently rated highly effective;

  • Creating specialized rubrics for particular teacher or
principal roles;
  • Providing free evaluator training for school districts and
boards of cooperative services (BOCES);
  • Providing guidelines for incorporating a licensed person's
professional growth achievements into the evaluation; and
  • Providing best practices in methods of conducting
evaluations.
The bill directs the state board of education (state board) to adopt
rules as necessary to ensure that, beginning with evaluations completed
in the 2023-24 school year:
  • 30% of a teacher's or principal's evaluation is based on the
academic growth of students, and the remainder is based on
the teacher's or principal's attainment of quality standards;
  • Up to 10% of a licensed person's evaluation may be based
on collective measures for a particular grade level or for an
entire school, but the evaluation must not include collective
measures for students who are not enrolled in the school at
which the licensed person is employed; and
  • If a licensed person has been employed by a school district
or BOCES for one year or less, the person's evaluation
must not include collective measures and must not be based
on statewide assessment scores.
The bill encourages school districts and BOCES to experiment
with innovative methods of conducting observations to use in licensed
personnel evaluations. Under the bill, a school district or BOCES must
complete the licensed personnel evaluations within the school year for
which the person is evaluated and report the performance ratings, in
aggregate, to the department by June 30 of each school year. The bill
encourages school districts and BOCES to train multiple persons to serve
as evaluators so that a licensed person may request an alternative
evaluator.
For performance evaluations completed for the 2021-22 and
2022-23 school years, the bill prohibits the use of measures of student
academic growth derived from the Colorado growth model and measures
of student academic growth or performance based on a school district's,
board of cooperative service's, or school's performance plan type.

Governor Signed: 05/24/2022c
SB22-077 Interstate Licensed Professional Counselor Compact Senate:
J. Ginal (D)
House:
M. Young (D)

The bill enacts the Interstate Licensed Professional Counselors
Compact, which, once effective, will allow licensed professional

counselors in any state that has joined the compact (member state) to
provide:
  • Licensed professional counselor services in each member
state under a privilege to practice; and
  • Telehealth services in each member state under a privilege
to practice.
The bill authorizes the state board of licensed professional
counselor examiners (board) to promulgate rules and to facilitate
Colorado's participation in the compact, including notification to the
Counseling Compact Commission (commission) established by the
compact of any adverse action taken by the board against a Colorado
licensed professional counselor. The commission includes a delegate
from each member state and has the powers and duties set forth in the
bill. The compact becomes effective on the date the compact is enacted
in the tenth member state.

Governor Signed: 06/08/2022c
SB22-085 Colorado Safe Student Protection Program Senate:
R. Zenzinger (D)
House:
B. McLachlan (D)
M. Catlin (R)

The bill creates the Colorado safe student protection program
(program) to provide grants to school districts and charter schools to
support student safety, including equipment and training to ensure safe
student transportation on school buses, and to facilitate the development
of a secure website, online application, and mobile application that

provide parental notifications about student safety and age-appropriate
health and safety information at no cost to parents (secure digital
notification and information tools). The department of education
(department) operates the grant program and selects a program facilitator
to support schools awarded a program grant. The department allocates a
portion of the program money to the program facilitator.
Subject to available appropriations, program grants are 3-year
grants that cover the 2022-23 through 2024-25 school years. The
department annually distributes grant money. A grant recipient may use
a grant award to:
  • Provide parents with the secure digital notification and
information tools;
  • Increase the safety of students and the security of school
buses by equipping school buses with hardware and
software that monitor driver behavior and enable the buses
to communicate directly with first responders; and
  • Fund relevant school bus safety training, including federal
transportation security awareness training.
The program facilitator may be a public benefit corporation or a
nonprofit organization that operates with a charitable purpose and must
have at least 7 years of experience in student safety, including student
transportation safety. The department allocates program money to the
program facilitator. The program facilitator must use program money to:
  • Support program grant recipients;
  • Develop the secure digital notification and information
tools;
  • Recruit school bus drivers and conduct or facilitate federal
transportation security awareness training;
  • Develop and make publicly available school bus
transportation safety information and age-appropriate
student safety educational materials;
  • Conduct a statewide awareness campaign to reduce
instances of drivers illegally failing to stop for a school
bus; and
  • Seek additional sources of funding on behalf of the
program.
The program is a 3-year program that repeals in 2025. The bill
makes an appropriation.

House Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed: 05/12/2022c
SB22-140 Expansion Of Experiential Learning Opportunities Senate:
R. Gardner (R)
J. Coleman (D)
House:
B. McLachlan (D)
J. Amabile (D)


The bill requires the department of labor and employment
(department), in partnership with the business experiential-learning
commission in the department, the office of economic development, the
state work force development council, the departments of education and
higher education, the state board for community colleges and
occupational education, and area technical colleges, to provide incentives
to eligible employers to create high-quality, work-based learning
opportunities for adults and youth (incentive program).
The department is required to select at least 2 work-based learning
intermediaries (intermediaries) to coordinate employers, schools, youth,
and adults participating in the incentive program to establish work-based
learning opportunities and select employers to participate in the incentive
program.
The department shall provide monetary incentives to the selected
intermediaries and employers for the implementation of work-based
learning opportunities. The department is required to compile data
concerning the incentive program and submit a report to the business
committees of the senate and house of representatives during the State
Measurement for Accountable, Responsive, and Transparent (SMART)
Government Act hearings held each legislative session.
The office of future work in the department and its partners are
required to create a digital navigation program and employ digital
navigators to:
  • Reach out to youth and adults who have been historically
excluded or disengaged from work-based learning
opportunities and connect them with available
opportunities;
  • Address digital inequities, including access to digital
technology and computer skills training, cybersecurity, and
affordable internet service;
  • Refer youth and adults to career navigation services; and
  • Provide a one-stop service that includes: Making referrals
to work-based learning programs; facilitating enrollment in
digital literacy classes, workshops, and upskilling and
work-based learning opportunities; and assisting with
digital skill development, job applications, and access to
other benefits and services.
The office of new Americans in the department is required to:
  • Convene an 18-month global talent task force to study the
process for certain in-demand occupational licenses, look
at international credentials, and take advantage of the
global pool of skilled workers; and
  • Provide tools for new Americans and English language
learners to enter into work-based learning programs to
improve language and skills development for specific
occupations and careers.
The bill authorizes the executive director of the department to
promulgate rules to implement the incentive program and the digital
navigation program.
The general assembly is required to appropriate $6,100,000 to the
department for the purposes of the bill.

Governor Signed: 06/03/2022c
SB22-147 Behavioral Health-care Services For Children Senate:
C. Kolker (D)
House:
M. Young (D)

The bill creates in the university of Colorado the Colorado
pediatric psychiatry consultation and access program (CoPPCAP). The
purpose of CoPPCAP is to support primary care providers in identifying
and treating mild to moderate behavioral health conditions in children in
primary care practices or school-based health centers.
The bill requires the general assembly to appropriate from the

behavioral and mental health cash fund:
  • $4.6 million to CoPPCAP;
  • $5 million to the behavioral health care professional
matching grant program to expand access to behavioral
health-care services for children and families; and
  • $1.5 million to the school-based health center grant
program.

Governor Signed: 05/17/2022c
SB22-165 Colorado Career Advisor Training Program Senate:
J. Bridges (D)
House:
M. Lindsay (D)

The bill creates the Colorado career advisor training program in
the department of education (department) to provide training to career
advisors in Colorado. The department administers the program. The bill
creates in the department the Colorado advisor training program fund
(fund) and appropriates one million dollars from the general fund to the
fund for purposes of the program.

Governor Signed: 06/03/2022b
SB22-171 Privacy Protections For Educators Senate:
K. Priola (D)
J. Bridges (D)
House:
B. McLachlan (D)
C. Kipp (D)

The bill adds educators to the list of protected persons whose
personal information may be withheld from the internet if the protected
person believes dissemination of such information poses an imminent and
serious threat to the protected person or the safety of the protected
person's immediate family.
Under current law, the Colorado Open Records Act (CORA)

definition of personnel file does not include the specific date of an
educator's absence from work. The bill amends the CORA definition of
personnel file to include the specific date of an educator's absence from
work.

Governor Signed: 05/26/2022c
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