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Legislative Year: 2024 Change
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Bill Detail: HB24-1135

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Title Offenses Related to Operating a Vehicle
Status Governor Signed (05/20/2024)
Bill Subjects
  • Crimes, Corrections, & Enforcement
  • Transportation & Motor Vehicles
House Sponsors M. Snyder (D)
M. Soper (R)
Senate Sponsors D. Roberts (D)
P. Will (R)
House Committee Judiciary
Senate Committee Judiciary
Date Introduced 01/29/2024
Summary

Under existing law, it is a class A traffic infraction to operate a
commercial motor vehicle without a commercial driver's license, to
operate a commercial motor vehicle if the operator is under 21 years of
age, or to drive a commercial motor vehicle if the person has more than
one driver's license. The bill makes each a class 1 misdemeanor; except
that, if a person presents a valid commercial driver's license to the court
within 30 days, the offense is a class A traffic infraction.
The bill creates the offense of unlawful direction to operate a
commercial motor vehicle. An employer who knowingly authorizes or
permits an employee to operate a commercial motor vehicle without a
commercial driver's license, or permits an employee who is under 21
years of age to operate a commercial motor vehicle, commits unlawful
direction to operate a commercial motor vehicle, a class 1 misdemeanor
traffic offense.
The bill requires a driver to comply with a search warrant to
conduct a blood draw. Failure to comply with a warrant to conduct a
blood draw is a misdemeanor; except that it is a class 4 felony if the
violation occurred after 3 or more prior convictions, arising out of
separate and distinct criminal episodes, for driving under the influence
(DUI), DUI per se, or driving while ability impaired (collectively,
impaired driving offenses); vehicular homicide; vehicular assault; or any
combination thereof. A driver who fails to comply with a warrant to
conduct a blood draw is subject to the same criminal penalties as for DUI.
Under existing law, a person whose privilege to drive was revoked
for multiple convictions for any combination of impaired driving offenses
must have an interlock-restricted license for 2 to 5 years. The bill requires
a person whose privilege to drive was revoked following a conviction for
a DUI or DUI per se to hold an interlock-restricted license for at least:
  • 2 years, if the DUI or DUI per se conviction is a second
conviction for any combination of impaired driving
offenses;
  • 3 years, if the DUI or DUI per se conviction is a third
conviction for any combination of impaired driving
offenses; and
  • 4 years, if the DUI or DUI per se conviction is a fourth
conviction for any combination of impaired driving
offenses.
Under existing law, a persistent drunk driver is required to hold the
interlock-restricted license for at least 2 years following reinstatement.
The bill requires a persistent drunk driver to hold an interlock-restricted
license for at least 3 years following a second violation for refusal to take
or complete a test for the purpose of determining the alcoholic content of
the driver's blood or breath upon a law enforcement officer's request.

Committee Reports
with Amendments
Full Text
Full Text of Bill (pdf) (most recent)
Fiscal Notes Fiscal Notes (04/03/2024) (most recent)  
Additional Bill Documents Bill Documents
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  • Past fiscal notes
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