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Bill: HB24-1007
Title: Prohibit Residential Occupancy Limits
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
T. Exum Sr. (D)
J. Gonzales (D)
House:
J. Mabrey (D)
M. Rutinel (D)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing RoomSenate Committee Room 352
Intro Date01/10/2024
DescriptionConcerning residential occupancy limits.
HistoryBill History
Save to CalendarAdd to Google
Bill Subject- Housing
- Local Government
Amendments
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsJ. Mabrey (D)
M. Rutinel (D)
Senate SponsorsT. Exum Sr. (D)
J. Gonzales (D)
Position
Summary

The bill prohibits local governments from enacting or enforcing
residential occupancy limits unless those limits are tied to a minimum
square footage per person requirement that is necessary to regulate safety,
health, and welfare.

StatusIntroduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing (02/12/2024)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (01/23/2024)
Hearing Date03/12/2024
Hearing Time2:00 PM
House CommitteeTransportation, Housing and Local Government
Senate CommitteeLocal Government and Housing
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: HB24-1011
Title: Mortgage Servicers Disburse Insurance Proceeds
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
L. Cutter (D)
J. Marchman (D)
House:
K. Brown (D)
J. Amabile (D)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing Room
Intro Date01/10/2024
DescriptionConcerning mortgage servicers, and, in connection therewith, requiring mortgage servicers to take certain actions regarding the disbursement of insurance proceeds to borrowers.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Health Care & Health Insurance
- Housing
- Insurance
Amendments
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsK. Brown (D)
J. Amabile (D)
Senate SponsorsL. Cutter (D)
J. Marchman (D)
Position
Summary

The bill requires a mortgage servicer to disclose certain
information to a borrower concerning the disbursement of insurance
proceeds to the borrower in the event that a residential property that is
subject to a mortgage is damaged or destroyed and an insurance company
pays a claim associated with such damage or destruction.
In the event that half or more of a residential property is damaged
or destroyed, a mortgage servicer must work with the borrower to create
a repair plan or a rebuild plan that includes specific milestones that
require the mortgage servicer to disburse insurance proceeds. However,
a mortgage servicer must also disburse insurance proceeds to a borrower
in specified amounts, depending on the amount of the insurance proceeds
and whether the borrower is delinquent in making payments on the
mortgage.
A mortgage servicer must promptly disburse to a borrower any
amount of insurance proceeds in excess of the remaining amount that the
borrower owes on the mortgage.
A mortgage servicer must hold in an interest-bearing account any
insurance proceeds that the mortgage servicer does not immediately
disburse to a borrower. A mortgage servicer must ensure that any interest
that is credited to the account is credited and disbursed to the borrower.
A mortgage servicer must retain for at least 4 years all written and
electronic communications between the mortgage servicer and a
borrower.

StatusIntroduced In Senate - Assigned to Business, Labor, & Technology (02/09/2024)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (01/17/2024)
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
House CommitteeBusiness Affairs and Labor
Senate CommitteeBusiness, Labor and Technology
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: HB24-1085
Title: Limitation on Actions against Appraisers
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
J. Ginal (D)
R. Gardner (R)
House:
J. Amabile (D)
L. Frizell (R)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing Room
Intro Date01/10/2024
DescriptionConcerning establishing a limitation of actions against an individual performing a real estate appraisal practice.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Courts & Judicial
Amendments
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsJ. Amabile (D)
L. Frizell (R)
Senate SponsorsJ. Ginal (D)
R. Gardner (R)
Position
Summary

Under current law, the statute of limitation to bring a claim against
a real estate appraiser does not commence until the party filing the claim
discovers, or should discover, an alleged defect in the appraisal.
The bill requires a claimant to bring an action against a real estate
appraiser or individual performing a real estate appraisal practice within
3 years after the date of report; except that, if a cause of action arises
during the third year after the date of report, the action must be brought
within 2 years after the date the cause of action arose.

StatusIntroduced In Senate - Assigned to Judiciary (02/20/2024)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (01/17/2024)
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
House CommitteeBusiness Affairs and Labor
Senate CommitteeJudiciary
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: HB24-1152
Title: Accessory Dwelling Units
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
T. Exum Sr. (D)
K. Mullica (D)
House:
J. Amabile (D)
R. Weinberg (R)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing Room
Intro Date01/30/2024
DescriptionConcerning increasing the number of accessory dwelling units.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Housing
- Local Government
- State Government
Amendments
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsJ. Amabile (D)
R. Weinberg (R)
Senate SponsorsT. Exum Sr. (D)
K. Mullica (D)
Position
Summary

Section 1 of the bill creates a series of requirements related to
accessory dwelling units. The bill establishes unique requirements for
subject jurisdictions and for qualifying as an accessory dwelling unit
supportive jurisdiction (supportive jurisdiction).
As established in the bill, a subject jurisdiction is either:
  • A municipality that has a population of 1,000 or more and
that is within the area of a metropolitan planning
organization; or
  • The portion of a county that is both within a census
designated place with a population of ten thousand or more,
as reported in the most recent decennial census, and within
the area of a metropolitan planning organization.
The bill requires a subject jurisdiction to allow, subject to an
administrative approval process, one accessory dwelling unit as an
accessory use to a single-unit detached dwelling in any part of the subject
jurisdiction where the subject jurisdiction allows single-unit detached
dwellings. The bill also prohibits subject jurisdictions from enacting or
enforcing certain local laws that would restrict the construction or
conversion of an accessory dwelling unit.
In order to qualify as a supportive jurisdiction, a jurisdiction must
submit a report to the division of local government in the department of
local affairs (the division) demonstrating that the jurisdiction:
  • Has complied with the accessory dwelling unit
requirements the bill imposes on subject jurisdictions; and
  • Has implemented one or more strategies to encourage and
facilitate the construction or conversion of accessory
dwelling units.
Section 1 also creates the accessory dwelling unit fee reduction
and encouragement grant program within the division. The purpose of
this grant program is for the division to provide grants to supportive
jurisdictions for offsetting costs incurred in connection with developing
pre-approved accessory dwelling unit plans, providing technical
assistance to persons converting or constructing accessory dwelling units,
or waiving or reducing accessory dwelling unit associated fees and other
required costs.
Section 2 grants the Colorado economic development commission
the power to expend $8 million to contract with the Colorado housing and
finance authority to operate and establish the following programs to
benefit the residents of supportive jurisdictions:
  • An accessory dwelling unit loss reserve program that offers
affordable loans for the construction or conversion of
accessory dwelling units;
  • A program that allows for the buying down of interest rates
on loans made in connection with the construction or
conversion of accessory dwelling units;
  • A program that offers down payment assistance in
connection with accessory dwelling units; and
  • A program through which the Colorado housing and
finance authority offers direct loans in connection with the
construction or conversion of accessory dwelling units.
Section 3 prohibits a planned unit development resolution or
ordinance for a planned unit development from restricting the permitting
of an accessory dwelling unit more than the local law that applies to
accessory dwelling units outside of the planned unit development.
Section 4 states that any prohibition on accessory dwelling units
or the implementation of restrictive design or dimension standards by a
unit owners' association in a supportive jurisdiction is void as a matter of
public policy.

StatusHouse Committee on Transportation, Housing & Local Government Refer Amended to Appropriations (02/27/2024)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/22/2024)
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
House CommitteeTransportation, Housing and Local Government
Senate Committee
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: HB24-1158
Title: Homeowners' Association Foreclosure Sales Requirements
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:

House:
N. Ricks (D)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing Room
Intro Date01/31/2024
DescriptionConcerning the protection of unit owners in relation to foreclosures by unit owners' associations.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Housing
AmendmentsNone
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsN. Ricks (D)
Senate Sponsors
Position
Summary

The bill makes changes to the law relating to the foreclosure of a
unit owners' association's (HOA) lien on a homeowner's (unit owner's)
home (unit) for unpaid HOA assessments.
Prior to the HOA turning over a delinquent account to collections
or to an attorney for legal action, the bill requires the HOA to send notice
to the unit owner that free information about collections and foreclosures
may be obtained through the department of regulatory agencies' HOA
information and resource center. Further, before foreclosing on an HOA
lien, the HOA shall provide notice to the unit owner that credit counseling
is available at the unit owner's expense relating to the impact of
foreclosure and options to avoid foreclosure.
The bill limits a court's award of reasonable attorney fees that an
HOA incurs when foreclosing on an HOA lien to $2,500. Further,
currently, an executive board member, employee of the HOA's
community association management company, and employees of the law
firm representing the HOA, and such individuals' immediate family
members, are prohibited from purchasing a foreclosed unit. The bill
extends the individuals or entities prohibited from purchasing a
foreclosed unit to include a community association management company
representing the HOA and an individual who was a board member,
employee of the HOA's community association management company, or
employee of the law firm representing the HOA, or such individuals'
immediate family members, during any of the 5-year period preceding the
foreclosure sale, as well as a business entity owned by or affiliated with
a community association management company or such individuals.
The bill establishes a minimum initial bid amount for the HOA's
sale at auction of a unit after foreclosure of the HOA's priority lien for
assessments. The amount of the HOA's initial bid at auction must be at
least the amount necessary to satisfy the HOA lien foreclosed, the liens
for unpaid real estate taxes or other government taxes, and the first
mortgage secured by the unit, as well as an amount equal to 60% of the
unit owner's equity in the unit, as determined in accordance with the bill,
unless the percentage of equity included in the bid amount is decreased
by agreement of the unit owner and the HOA. The bill authorizes a
different minimum bid amount if the unit owner does not have equity in
the unit at the time of the foreclosure sale. Further, the HOA is required
to include the minimum bid amount and the information necessary to
calculate the minimum bid in the lis pendens filed with the county clerk
and recorder in the county where the unit is located.
For purposes of notice of the sale of a unit at auction, the bill
amends the mailing list to include the unit owner's address listed in the
county assessor's records for the unit, if that address is different from the
property address, as well as the address of the unit owner's property
manager employed by the unit owner, if that person is known to the HOA.
The bill applies to HOA liens foreclosed on or after October 1,
2024.

StatusIntroduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government (01/31/2024)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/08/2024)
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
House CommitteeTransportation, Housing and Local Government
Senate Committee
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: HB24-1175
Title: Local Goverments Rights to Property for Affordable Housing
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
F. Winter (D)
S. Jaquez Lewis (D)
House:
E. Sirota (D)
A. Boesenecker (D)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing RoomHouse Chamber
Intro Date01/31/2024
DescriptionConcerning a local government right of first refusal or offer to purchase qualifying multifamily property for the purpose of providing long-term affordable housing or mixed-income development.
HistoryBill History
Save to CalendarAdd to Google
Bill Subject- Housing
- Local Government
Amendments
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsE. Sirota (D)
A. Boesenecker (D)
Senate SponsorsF. Winter (D)
S. Jaquez Lewis (D)
Position
Summary

The bill creates 2 property rights for local governments to certain
types of multifamily rental properties: A right of first refusal and a right
of first offer. The right of first offer is temporary and terminates on
December 31, 2029. For multifamily rental properties that are existing
affordable housing, a local government has a right of first refusal to
match an acceptable offer for the purchase of such property, subject to the
local government's commitment to using the property as long-term
affordable housing. Existing affordable housing is housing that is
currently receiving federal or local financial assistance.
The bill requires the seller of such property to give notice to the
local government at least 2 years before the first expiration of an existing
affordability restriction on the property and again when the seller takes
certain actions as a precursor to selling the property. Upon receiving the
notice indicating intent to sell the property or of a potential sale of the
property, the local government has 14 calendar days to preserve its right
of first refusal and an additional 60 calendar days to make an offer and
must agree to close on the property within 120 calendar days of the
acceptance of the local government's offer. If the price, terms, and
conditions of an acceptable offer that has been communicated to the local
government materially change, the seller must provide notice of the
change within 7 days and the local government may exercise or
re-exercise its right of first refusal. If the residential seller rejects an offer
by the local government, the seller must provide a written explanation of
the reasons and invite the local government to make a subsequent offer
within 14 days.
For all other multifamily rental properties that are 20 years or older
and have not more than 100 units and not less than 5 units in urban
counties and 3 units in rural and rural resort counties, a local government
has a right of first offer. A seller of such property must provide notice of
intent to sell the property to the local government before the seller lists
the property for sale. After receipt of the notice, the local government has
14 days to respond by either making an offer to purchase the property and
stating an intent to perform due diligence and enter into a contract to
purchase the property within 45 days of the date that the residential
seller's notice was received or waiving its right to purchase the property.
The local government's offer is subject to the property being used or
converted for the purpose of providing long-term affordable housing or
mixed-income development. If the local government does not provide a
response in the 14-day period, the right of first offer is waived and the
residential seller can proceed with listing and selling the property to any
third-party buyer. The residential seller has 14 days to accept or reject the
local government's offer and, if the offer is accepted, the local
government has 30 days to close the transaction.
In exercising its right of first refusal or first offer, the local
government may partner with certain other entities for financing of the
transaction and may also assign either right to certain other entities that
are then subject to all the rights and requirements of the local government
in exercising either right.
The bill allows certain sales of property to be exempt from either
the right of first refusal, the right of first offer, or both. The bill also
allows the local government to waive its right of first refusal to purchase
property qualifying for the right if the local government elects to disclaim
its rights to any proposed transaction or for any duration of time.
The bill also requires the attorney general's office to enforce its
provisions and grants the attorney general's office, the local government,
or a mission-driven organization standing to bring a civil action for
violations of the right of first refusal or first offer established by the bill.
If a court finds that a seller has materially violated the law with respect
to the right of first refusal or first offer, respectively, the court must award
a statutory penalty of not less than $30,000.

StatusHouse Second Reading Laid Over Daily - No Amendments (02/23/2024)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/12/2024)
Hearing Date02/29/2024
Hearing Time9:00 AM
House CommitteeTransportation, Housing and Local Government
Senate Committee
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: HB24-1179
Title: 2023 Property Tax Year Updated Abstract
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
C. Hansen (D)
M. Baisley (R)
House:
C. deGruy Kennedy (D)
L. Frizell (R)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing Room
Intro Date02/01/2024
DescriptionConcerning the creation of an updated abstract for the 2023 property tax year.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Fiscal Policy & Taxes
- Local Government
Amendments
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsC. deGruy Kennedy (D)
L. Frizell (R)
Senate SponsorsC. Hansen (D)
M. Baisley (R)
Position
Summary

Under current law, a county assessor is required to complete an
assessment roll of all taxable property within the assessor's county and an
accompanying abstract of assessment (abstract). Depending on whether
a county has elected to use an alternate protest and appeal procedure to
determine objections and protests concerning valuations of taxable
property, the county assessor is required to complete the assessment roll
and abstract on or before either August 25 or November 21 of every year.
During the first extraordinary session of the seventy-fourth general
assembly, which occurred in November 2023, the general assembly
enacted Senate Bill 23B-001 (SB 001), and the governor signed SB 001
into law on November 20, 2023. SB 001 modified the valuation for
assessment for residential real property for the 2023 property tax year and
accordingly rendered inaccurate the abstracts completed on or before
August 25, 2023, and November 21, 2023.
The bill requires a county assessor to prepare an updated abstract
and file a copy of that abstract, along with updated versions of other
information that a county assessor is required to append to an abstract,
with the property tax administrator no later than February 20, 2024.

StatusGovernor Signed (02/15/2024)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/02/2024)
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
House CommitteeFinance
Senate CommitteeFinance
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: HB24-1230
Title: Protections for Real Property Owners
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:

House:
J. Bacon (D)
J. Parenti (D)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing RoomHouse Committee Room 0107
Intro Date02/12/2024
DescriptionConcerning protections for property owners with respect to improvements to real property.
HistoryBill History
Save to CalendarAdd to Google
Bill Subject- Housing
AmendmentsNone
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsJ. Bacon (D)
J. Parenti (D)
Senate Sponsors
Position
Summary

Current law declares void any express waivers of or limitations on
the legal rights or remedies provided by the Construction Defect Action
Reform Act or the Colorado Consumer Protection Act. Sections 1 and
4
make it a violation of the Colorado Consumer Protection Act to
obtain or attempt to obtain a waiver or limitation that violates the
aforementioned current law. Section 4 also requires a court to award to
a claimant that prevails in a claim arising from alleged defects in a
residential property construction, in addition to actual damages,
prejudgment interest on the claim at a rate of 6% from the date the work
is finished to the date it is sold to an occupant and 8% thereafter.
Current law requires that a lawsuit against an architect, a
contractor, a builder or builder vendor, an engineer, or an inspector
performing or furnishing the design, planning, supervision, inspection,
construction, or observation of construction of an improvement to real
property must be brought within 6 years after the claim arises. Section 2
increases the amount of time in which a lawsuit may be brought from 6
to 10 years. Current law also provides that a claim of relief arises when
a defect's physical manifestation was discovered or should have been
discovered. Section 2 also changes the time when a claim of relief arises
to include both the discovery of the physical manifestation and the cause
of the defect.
Section 3 voids a provision in a real estate contract that prohibits
group lawsuits against a construction professional.
Section 5 of the bill prohibits governing documents of a common
interest community from setting different or additional requirements than
those in current law for a construction defect action.

StatusIntroduced In House - Assigned to Judiciary (02/12/2024)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/15/2024)
Hearing Date03/06/2024
Hearing Time1:30 PM
House CommitteeJudiciary
Senate Committee
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: HB24-1299
Title: Short-Term Rental Unit Property Tax Classification
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
K. Mullica (D)
House:
S. Bird (D)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing RoomHouse Committee Room 0112
Intro Date02/14/2024
DescriptionConcerning the classification of short-term rental units for purposes of property tax treatment.
HistoryBill History
Save to CalendarAdd to Google
Bill Subject- Fiscal Policy & Taxes
AmendmentsNone
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsS. Bird (D)
Senate SponsorsK. Mullica (D)
Position
Summary

The bill defines a short-term rental unit as a building that is
designed for use predominantly as a place of residency by a person, a
family, or families, is leased or available to be leased for short-term stays,
and includes the land upon which the building is located. A commercial
short-term rental unit is defined as a short-term rental unit that is not the
owner's primary or secondary residence.
A commercial short-term rental unit is classified as lodging
property, which is a subclass of nonresidential property for purposes of
valuation for assessment. A short-term rental unit that is the owner's
primary or secondary residence will continue to be classified as
residential property.
On or before November 15, 2024, and on or before November 15
of each year thereafter, an owner of a short-term rental unit shall submit
to the assessor of the county in which the property is located an affidavit
signed by the owner, under the penalty of perjury in the second degree,
identifying whether the property will continue to be used as a short-term
rental unit in the following property tax year commencing on January 1,
and if so, whether it will be the owner's primary or secondary residence.
Absent contrary information, the assessor shall use the information in the
affidavit to determine whether the property is a commercial short-term
rental unit. If a commercial short-term rental unit is sold, the new owner
shall submit an affidavit to the county assessor if the property will no
longer be a commercial short-term rental unit for the classification of the
property to change for the subsequent property tax year.

StatusIntroduced In House - Assigned to Finance (02/14/2024)
Fiscal Notes 
Hearing Date03/25/2024
Hearing Time1:30 PM
House CommitteeFinance
Senate Committee
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: HB24-1313
Title: Housing in Transit-Oriented Communities
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
F. Winter (D)
C. Hansen (D)
House:
S. Woodrow (D)
I. Jodeh (D)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing RoomOld State Library
Intro Date02/20/2024
DescriptionConcerning measures to increase the affordability of housing in transit-oriented communities.
HistoryBill History
Save to CalendarAdd to Google
Bill Subject- Housing
- Local Government
- State Government
AmendmentsNone
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsS. Woodrow (D)
I. Jodeh (D)
Senate SponsorsF. Winter (D)
C. Hansen (D)
Position
Summary

Section 1 of the bill establishes a category of local government: A
transit-oriented community. As defined in the bill, a transit-oriented
community is either a local government that:
  • Is entirely within a metropolitan planning organization;
  • Has a population of 4,000 or more; and
  • Contains at least 75 acres of certain transit-related areas; or
If the local government is a county, contains either a part of:
  • A transit station area that is both in an unincorporated part
of the county and within one-half mile of a station that
serves a commuter rail service or light rail service; or
  • A transit corridor area that both is in an unincorporated part
of the county and is fully encompassed by one or more
municipalities.
The bill requires a transit-oriented community to meet its housing
opportunity goal and relatedly requires the department to:
  • On or before July 31, 2024, publish a map that designates
transit areas that transit-oriented communities shall use in
calculating their housing opportunity goal; and
  • On or before December 31, 2024, publish models and
guidance to assist a transit-oriented community in meeting
its housing opportunity goal.
A housing opportunity goal is a zoning capacity goal determined
based on an average zoned housing density and the amount of
transit-related areas within a transit-oriented community. The bill requires
a transit-oriented community to meet its housing opportunity goal by
ensuring that enough areas in the transit-oriented community qualify as
transit centers. In order to qualify as a transit center, an area must:
  • Be composed of zoning districts that uniformly allow a net
housing density of at least 15 units per acre;
  • Identify the net housing density allowed by law;
  • Meet a housing density established by the transit-oriented
community;
  • Not include any area where local law exclusively restricts
housing occupancy based on age or other factors;
  • Have an administrative approval process for multifamily
residential property development on parcels that are 5 acres
or less in size;
  • Be composed of contiguous parcels, if located partially
outside of a transit area; and
  • Be located wholly within a transit area and not extend more
than one-quarter mile from the edge of a transit area, unless
the department allows otherwise.
A transit-oriented community is required to demonstrate that it has
met is housing opportunity goal by submitting a housing opportunity goal
report to the department of local affairs (department). A housing
opportunity goal report must include:
  • The housing opportunity goal calculation that the
transit-oriented community used in determining its housing
opportunity goal;
  • Evidence that the transit-oriented community has met its
housing opportunity goal;
  • A map that identifies the boundaries of any transit centers
within the transit-oriented community;
  • If relevant, a plan to address potential insufficient water
supplies for meeting the transit-oriented community's
housing opportunity goal;
  • Affordability strategies that the transit-oriented community
will implement in meeting its housing opportunity goal.
The transit-oriented community shall select some of these
strategies from the standard and long-term affordability
strategies menus in the bill, and the transit-oriented
community shall include an implementation plan describing
how it will implement these strategies.
  • Any displacement mitigation strategies that the
transit-oriented community has or will adopt from the
displacement mitigation strategies menu in the bill and an
implementation plan describing how it will implement
these strategies.
Additionally, the bill requires a transit-oriented community to submit a
progress report to the department every 3 years.
After receiving a transit-oriented community's housing opportunity
goal report, the department shall either approve the report or provide
direction to the transit-oriented community for amending and
resubmitting the report and require the transit-oriented community to
resubmit the report. If a transit-oriented community does not submit a
housing opportunity goal report to the department on or before December
31, 2026, or if the department does not approve a transit-oriented
community's housing opportunity goal report, the department will
designate the transit-oriented community as a nonqualified
transit-oriented community. Similarly, if a transit-oriented community
does not submit a progress report to the department every 3 years, or if
the department does not approve a transit-oriented community's progress
report, the department will designate the transit-oriented community as a
nonqualified transit-oriented community.
The state treasurer shall transfer any money that a nonqualified
transit-oriented community would have otherwise been allocated from the
highway users tax fund instead to the transit-oriented communities
highway users tax account (account). The department shall not use any
money in the account that is attributable to a specific nonqualified
transit-oriented community until 180 days after the transit-oriented
community became a nonqualified transit-oriented community. If a
nonqualified transit-oriented community no longer qualifies as a
nonqualified transit-oriented community during that 180-day period, the
treasurer shall issue a warrant to the transit-oriented community for the
amount of money that was diverted from the transit-oriented community
to the account.
If the department does not approve a transit-oriented community's
housing opportunity goal report on or before December 31, 2027, the
department may seek an injunction requiring the transit-oriented
community to comply with the requirements of the bill.
In addition to designating an area as a transit center for purposes
of meeting a housing opportunity goal, the bill allows local governments
to designate an area as a neighborhood center so long as the local
government ensures that the area:
  • Has an average zoned housing density sufficient to increase
public transit ridership;
  • Has an administrative approval process for multifamily
residential property development on parcels that are no
larger than a size determined by the department;
  • Has a mixed-use walkable neighborhood; and
  • Satisfies any other criteria required by the department.
The bill also creates the transit-oriented communities infrastructure
fund grant program (grant program) within the department. The purpose
of the grant program is to assist local governments in upgrading
infrastructure within transit centers and neighborhood centers. In
administering the grant program, the department shall prioritize grant
applicants based on the information in the reports described in the bill.
Grants from the grant program are awarded from money in the
transit-oriented communities infrastructure fund (fund). The fund consists
of gifts, grants, and donations along with money that the general assembly
may appropriate or transfer to the fund and money in the account
described in the bill. The fund is continuously appropriated. On July 1,
2024, the state treasurer shall transfer $35 million from the general fund
to the fund.
Section 2 prohibits a planned unit development resolution or
ordinance for a planned unit development that is adopted on or after the
effective date of the bill and that applies within a transit-oriented center
or neighborhood center from restricting the development of housing more
than the local law that applies to that transit-oriented center or
neighborhood center.
Section 3 states that any restriction by a unit owners' association
within a transit-oriented center or neighborhood center on the
development of housing that is adopted on or after the effective date of
the bill and is beyond the local law that applies to that transit-oriented
center or neighborhood center is void as a matter of public policy.
Sections 4 and 5 require the Colorado housing and financing
authority to allocate tax credits under the state affordable housing tax
credit to qualified housing developments within transit centers.

StatusIntroduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government (02/20/2024)
Fiscal Notes 
Hearing Date03/06/2024
Hearing Time1:30 PM
House CommitteeTransportation, Housing and Local Government
Senate Committee
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: HB24-1337
Title: Real Property Owner Unit Association Collections
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:

House:
J. Bacon (D)
I. Jodeh (D)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing RoomLegislative Services Building Hearing Room A
Intro Date02/26/2024
DescriptionConcerning the rights of a unit owner in a common interest community in relation to the collection of amounts owed by the unit owner to the common interest community.
HistoryBill History
Save to CalendarAdd to Google
Bill Subject- Civil Law
- Housing
AmendmentsNone
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsJ. Bacon (D)
I. Jodeh (D)
Senate Sponsors
Position
Summary

In common interest communities for real property, current law
allows a unit owners' association (association) to require, without starting
a legal proceeding, a unit owner to reimburse the association for
collection costs, attorney fees, or other costs resulting from the owner
failing to timely pay assessments or other money owed. The bill limits the
reimbursement amount to 50% of the original money owed.
Current law allows the association to require, without starting a
legal proceeding, a unit owner to reimburse the association for collection
costs and attorney fees resulting from the owner failing to obey the
bylaws or rules of the association. The bill limits the reimbursement
amount to 50% of the actual cost the association incurred for the failure
to obey.
Current law requires a court to award an association reasonable
attorney fees, costs, and collection costs in an action in which the
association seeks to collect unpaid assessments or enforce or defend the
association's bylaws or rules and the association prevails in the matter.
The bill limits the award to 50% of the balance owed to the association.
Current law grants an association a lien on the unit for amounts
owed to the association by the unit owner. The bill prohibits foreclosing
on the lien until:
  • The association has:
  • Obtained a personal judgment against the unit
owner in a civil action;
  • Attempted to bring a civil action against the unit
owner but was prevented by the death of or
incapacity of the unit owner; or
  • Attempted to bring a civil action against the unit
owner but the association was unable to serve the
unit owner within 180 days; or
  • The unit owner is in a bankruptcy civil action.
Current law requires the association to attempt to enter into a
payment plan to collect amounts due from a unit owner. The bill prohibits
foreclosure on the lien if the unit owner is in compliance with the
payment plan.
The bill creates a right of redemption following certain involuntary
transfers of a unit to the association or a foreclosure purchaser for 180
days following the transfer. During the 180 days, the foreclosure
purchaser or association is prohibited from selling the unit. The following
people have the right of redemption in order of priority:
  • The unit owner;
  • A tenant of the unit;
  • A nonprofit entity whose primary purpose is the
development or preservation of affordable housing;
  • A community land trust;
  • A cooperative housing corporation; and
  • The state of Colorado or a political subdivision of the state
of Colorado.
The redeemer may send a notice of intent to exercise the right of
redemption. Upon receiving the notice of intent, the foreclosure purchaser
or association is prohibited for a specified time from transferring the
property to an authorized redeemer that has lower priority than the
authorized redeemer that sent the notice.
To redeem a unit, the redeemer must reimburse the foreclosure
purchaser or association in accordance with the standards set by the bill.
Failure to execute a deed after redemption subjects the owner to liability
plus attorney fees. Procedures are set for exercising the right of
redemption and for recording deeds, affidavits, or certificates of
compliance concerning the right of redemption with the county clerk and
recorder. Filing an affidavit or certificate of compliance with the county
clerk and recorder without a reasonable basis subjects the person to
liability and attorney fees.
If a redeemer makes partial payment, but fails to pay all amounts
necessary to redeem the unit before the redemption period expires, the
association or foreclosure purchaser shall refund the partial payment on
or before 30 days after the expiration of the redemption period.

StatusIntroduced In House - Assigned to Transportation, Housing & Local Government (02/26/2024)
Fiscal Notes 
Hearing Date03/12/2024
Hearing Time1:30 PM
House CommitteeTransportation, Housing and Local Government
Senate Committee
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: SB24-033
Title: Lodging Property Tax Treatment
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
C. Hansen (D)
House:
M. Weissman (D)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing Room
Intro Date01/10/2024
DescriptionConcerning the property tax treatment of real property that is used to provide lodging.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Fiscal Policy & Taxes
AmendmentsNone
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsM. Weissman (D)
Senate SponsorsC. Hansen (D)
Position
Summary

Legislative Oversight Committee Concerning Tax Policy. The
bill establishes that, for property tax years commencing on or after
January 1, 2026, a short-term rental unit, which is an improvement that
is designated and used as a place of residency by a person, family, or
families, but that is also leased for overnight lodging for less than 30
consecutive days in exchange for a monetary payment (short-term stay)
and is not a primary residence, and the land upon which the improvement
is located, may be classified as either residential real property or lodging
property. If, during the previous property tax year, a short-term rental unit
was leased for short-term stays for more than 90 days, then it is classified
as lodging property. Otherwise, it is classified as residential real property.
Actual value for a short-term rental unit that is classified as lodging
property is to be determined solely by application of the market approach
to appraisal.
The bill also specifies, with an exception for a property that
qualifies as a bed and breakfast, that a building designed for use
predominantly as a place of residency by a person, a family, or families
but that is actually used, or available for use, to provide short-term stays
only is a hotel and motel.
For purposes of applying the classification of either residential or
lodging to a short-term rental unit, annually, the assessor is required to
send notice to owners of short-term rental units of the number of days
during the prior property tax year that the assessor has determined the
property was leased for short-term stays. An owner must sign and return
the notice and, if the owner disputes the number of days the property was
leased for short-term stays, the owner must provide evidence
demonstrating a different number of days the property was leased for
short-term stays.
Additionally, the property tax administrator is required to establish
and administer a pilot program to develop a statewide database and
uniform reporting system to track short-term rental units.

StatusIntroduced In Senate - Assigned to Finance (01/10/2024)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/06/2024)
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
House Committee
Senate CommitteeFinance
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: SB24-106
Title: Right to Remedy Construction Defects
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
R. Zenzinger (D)
J. Coleman (D)
House:
S. Bird (D)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing RoomSenate Committee Room 352
Intro Date02/05/2024
DescriptionConcerning legal actions based on claimed defects in construction projects.
HistoryBill History
Save to CalendarAdd to Google
Bill Subject- Courts & Judicial
- Housing
AmendmentsNone
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsS. Bird (D)
Senate SponsorsR. Zenzinger (D)
J. Coleman (D)
Position
Summary

In the Construction Defect Action Reform Act (act), Colorado
law establishes procedures for bringing a lawsuit for a construction defect
(claim). Section 2 of the bill clarifies that a person that has had a claim
brought on the person's behalf is also considered a claimant, and
therefore, the act applies to the person for whom the claim is brought.
Sections 3 and 6 create a right for a construction professional to
remedy a claim made against the construction professional by doing
remedial work or hiring another construction professional to perform the
work. The following applies to the remedy:
  • The construction professional must notify the claimant and
diligently make sure the remedial work is performed; and
  • Upon completion, the claimant is deemed to have settled
and released the claim, and the claimant is limited to claims
regarding improper performance of the remedial work.
Currently, a claim may be held in abeyance if the parties have
agreed to mediation. Section 3 also adds other forms of alternative
dispute resolution for which the claim would be held in abeyance.
Alternative dispute resolution is binding. If a settlement offer of a
payment is made and accepted in a claim, the payment constitutes a
settlement of the claim and the cause of action is deemed to have been
released, and an offer of settlement is not admissible in any subsequent
action or legal proceeding unless the proceeding is to enforce the
settlement.
To bring a claim or related action, section 4 requires a unit owners'
association (association) to obtain the written consent of at least
two-thirds of the actual owners of the units in the common interest
community. The consent must contain the currently required notices, must
be signed by each consenting owner, and must have certain attestations.
Under the act, a claimant is barred from seeking damages for
failing to comply with building codes or industry standards unless the
failure results in:
  • Actual damage to real or personal property;
  • Actual loss of the use of real or personal property;
  • Bodily injury or wrongful death; or
  • A risk of bodily injury or death to, or a threat to the life,
health, or safety of, the occupants.
Section 5 requires the actual property damage to be the result of a
building code violation and requires the risk of injury or death or the
threat to life, health, or safety to be imminent and unreasonable.
Under current law, an association may institute, defend, or
intervene in litigation or administrative proceedings in its own name on
behalf of itself or 2 or more unit owners on matters affecting a common
interest community. For a construction defect matter to affect a common
interest community, section 7 requires that the matter concern real estate
that is owned by the association or by all members of the association.
Section 7 also establishes that, when an association makes a claim
or takes legal action on behalf of unit owners when the matter does not
concern real estate owned by the association:
  • The association and each claim are subject to each defense,
limitation, claim procedure, and alternative dispute
resolution procedure that each unit owner would be subject
to if the unit owner had brought the claim; and
  • The association has a fiduciary duty to act in the best
interest of each unit owner.

StatusIntroduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing (02/05/2024)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/14/2024)
Hearing Date03/05/2024
Hearing Time2:00 PM
House Committee
Senate CommitteeLocal Government and Housing
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: SB24-111
Title: Senior Primary Residence Prop Tax Reduction
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
C. Hansen (D)
C. Kolker (D)
House:
M. Young (D)
S. Lieder (D)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing Room
Intro Date02/05/2024
DescriptionConcerning a reduction in the valuation for assessment of qualified-senior primary residence real property.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Fiscal Policy & Taxes
- Local Government
Amendments
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsM. Young (D)
S. Lieder (D)
Senate SponsorsC. Hansen (D)
C. Kolker (D)
Position
Summary

For property tax years commencing on or after January 1, 2025, the
bill creates a new subclass of residential real property called
qualified-senior primary residence real property, which includes
residential real property that as of the assessment date is used as the
primary residence of an owner-occupier, as defined in the bill, if:
  • The owner-occupier applies to the county assessor for the
classification in the manner required by the bill;
  • The owner-occupier previously qualified for the property
tax exemption for qualifying seniors (exemption) for a
different property for a property tax year commencing on
or after January 1, 2016, and does not qualify for the
exemption for the current property tax year; and
  • The circumstances that qualify the property for the
classification have not changed since the filing of the
application.
The bill also:
  • Classifies property that might otherwise be classified as
multi-family residential real property that contains a unit
that qualifies as qualified-senior primary residence real
property as multi-family qualified-senior primary residence
real property and treats such property as qualified-senior
primary residence real property;
  • Sets the valuation for assessment for qualified-senior
primary residence real property at 7.15% of the amount
equal to the actual value of the property minus the lesser of
$100,000 or the amount that causes the valuation for
assessment of the property to be $1,000;
  • Establishes the processes by which an owner-occupier of
residential real property may apply to have the
owner-occupier's primary residence classified as
qualified-senior primary residence real property and by
which such an application is approved or denied;
  • Requires the state to reimburse local governmental entities
that levy property taxes for total property tax revenue lost
due solely to the reduced valuation for assessment of
qualified-senior primary residence real property as
compared to the valuation for assessment of other
residential real property and specifies the process by which
the proper amount of reimbursement is calculated and
reimbursement is made; and
  • For state fiscal years in which excess state revenues are
required to be refunded pursuant to the Taxpayer's Bill of
Rights, establishes the reimbursement to local
governmental entities as a means of refunding such excess
state revenues.

StatusSenate Committee on Finance Refer Amended to Appropriations (02/27/2024)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/23/2024)
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
House Committee
Senate CommitteeFinance
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: SB24-112
Title: Construction Defect Action Procedures
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
P. Lundeen (R)
House:
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing Room
Intro Date02/05/2024
DescriptionConcerning the procedures governing construction defect actions.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Courts & Judicial
- Housing
AmendmentsNone
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House Sponsors
Senate SponsorsP. Lundeen (R)
Position
Summary

Section 1 of the bill adds disclaimers to the Construction Defect
Action Reform Act that:
  • Are not intended to impose an obligation upon construction
professionals to provide an express or implied warranty;
  • Apply to implied warranty claims; and
  • Do not amend or change the terms of or limitation upon an
express or implied warranty.
The bill states that a construction professional is not vicariously
liable for the acts or omissions of a licensed design professional for any
construction defects.
Under current law regarding common interest communities, a unit
owners' association (association) must follow a process to obtain the
approval of a majority of the unit owners before initiating a construction
defect action (action). The approval process:
  • Requires that a meeting be held to consider whether or not
to bring the action (meeting);
  • Requires the association to give the unit owners
information about the proposed action and certain notices
and disclosures before the meeting;
  • Allows the association to amend or supplement the
proposed action after the meeting; and
  • Allows the association to omit nonresponsive votes from
the total vote count, but allows construction professionals
to challenge whether the association made diligent efforts
to contact the nonresponsive unit owners.
In connection with this process, section 2:
  • Requires the association to give notice to unit owners and
reobtain unit owner approval to amend or supplement a
proposed action after the meeting;
  • Raises the number of unit owners who need to approve the
action from a majority to a two-thirds majority;
  • Requires a unit owner to sign the unit owner's vote;
  • Requires the association to give the construction
professionals a list of nonresponsive unit owners; and
  • When unit owners' nonresponsiveness is challenged in
court:
  • Requires the court to stay the action against the
construction professionals and requires the
notification and voting process to be performed
again unless the court holds that the association
diligently contacted the unit owners; and
  • Requires the association to disclose to the
construction professionals all information relevant
to the unit owners' nonresponsiveness within 21
days after the challenge has been filed.

StatusIntroduced In Senate - Assigned to Local Government & Housing (02/05/2024)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/14/2024)
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
House Committee
Senate CommitteeLocal Government and Housing
VotesVotes all Legislators

Bill: SB24-126
Title: Conservation Easement Income Tax Credit
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
F. Winter (D)
P. Will (R)
House:
M. Lynch (R)
M. Lukens (D)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
Hearing RoomSenate Committee Room 357
Intro Date02/06/2024
DescriptionConcerning the conservation easement income tax credit, and, in connection therewith, extending the conservation easement oversight commission and the certified holder program indefinitely, increasing the limit on conservation easement income tax credits available to donors in one calendar year, and allowing multiple transfers of conservation easement income tax credits.
HistoryBill History
Save to CalendarAdd to Google
Bill Subject- Fiscal Policy & Taxes
Amendments
LobbyistsLobbyists
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Bill DocsBill Documents
House SponsorsM. Lynch (R)
M. Lukens (D)
Senate SponsorsF. Winter (D)
P. Will (R)
Position
Summary

Under current law, the conservation easement oversight
commission (commission) and the certified holder program (program) are
repealed on July 1, 2026. The bill eliminates the repeal dates to extend the
commission and program indefinitely.
There is currently a cap of $45 million for the total value of
conservation easement income tax credits (credits) that may be claimed
by and credited to donors of a conservation easement in one calendar
year. Credits filed after the cap is reached are placed on a wait list for the
next calendar year. The bill increases the cap to $75 million beginning in
calendar year 2025.
Current law provides that partnerships, S corporations, or other
similar entities (pass-through entities) may not be transferees of a credit.
The bill allows pass-through entities to be transferees of a credit
beginning on January 1, 2025. The bill also allows insurance companies
to purchase credits to offset insurance premium taxes.
Currently, a credit may be transferred once, in whole or in part,
from a donor to a transferee. The bill allows a transferee to transfer a
credit to a subsequent transferee beginning with the income tax year
starting on January 1, 2025.

StatusSenate Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources Refer Amended to Finance (02/22/2024)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/28/2024)
Hearing Date03/05/2024
Hearing Time2:00 PM
House Committee
Senate CommitteeAgriculture and Natural Resources
VotesVotes all Legislators
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